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HIS 241.01:  The Origins of Modern Russia

Autumn 2004

D. H. Kaiser

Mears 216, 269-3088

mailto:KAISER@grinnell.edu

http://web.grinnell.edu/individuals/kaiser

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Focusing upon the medieval origins of early East Slavic societies and the formation of the Muscovite state and Russian Empire, this course emphasizes the political, economic, and social components of pre-revolutionary Russia from the tenth through the nineteenth centuries.  The multiple forms of state-building, the dynamics of ethnicity and empire-building, and the role of gender, class and ideology receive special attention.  In addition to providing factual background on Russia's past, this course emphasizes historical interpretations and their relationship to original primary sources.  Most class sessions , therefore, will be devoted to discussions based upon the readings assigned for that day, so that students should arrive in class already having read and considered the assignments for that day.

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE OPTION:  Students who have studied or who are now studying Russian may wish to pursue the foreign-language option for this course;  the instructor encourages the exercise of Russian, and asks only that students interested in this possibility consult with him early in the semester to discuss alternatives available.

 

REQUIRED TEXTS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE IN COLLEGE BOOKSTORE:

Kaiser, Daniel H., and Gary Marker, eds.  Reinterpreting Russian History:  Readings 860-1860s.  NY, 1994.

Kappeler, Andreas.  The Russian Empire: A Multiethnic History.  Trans. Alfred Clayton.  London, 2001.

Moon, David.  Abolition of Serfdom in Russia.  London, 2001.

Moss, Walter G.  A History of Russia, vol. 1: To 1917.  London, 2003.

Pavlov, Andrei, and Maureen Perrie.  Ivan the Terrible.  London, 2003.

Poe, Marshall.  The Russian Moment in World History.  Princeton, 2003.

Whittaker, Cynthia Hyla, ed.  Russia Engages the World, 1453-1825.  Cambridge, MA, 2003.

 

RECOMMENDED TEXT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE IN BOOKSTORE:

      Neuberger, Joan.  Ivan the Terrible.  Kinofiles Film Companion 9.  London, 2003.

 

COURSE READING AVAILABLE AT RESERVE DESK OF BURLING LIBRARY (and indicated by an asterisk on the Course Schedule):

Dmytryshyn, Basil.  Medieval Russia:  A Sourcebook 900-1700.  NY, 1967.

Dmytryshyn, Basil.  Medieval Russia:  A Sourcebook 900-1700.  2d ed. NY, 1973.

Kaiser, Daniel H., and Gary Marker, eds.  Reinterpreting Russian History:  Readings 860-1860s.  NY, 1994.

Moss, Walter G.  A History of Russia, vol. 1: To 1917.  NY, 1997.

Neuberger, Joan.  Ivan the Terrible.  London, 2003.

Poe, Marshall T.  The Russian Moment in World History.  Princeton, 2003.

Whittaker, Cynthia Hyla.  Russia Engages the World, 1453-1825.  Cambridge, MA, 2003.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING:

  1. Daily Preparation:  As a means of encouraging daily preparation, each student will be expected to submit over the course of the semester five one-page analyses, each examining one original primary source selected from those assigned for a particular class session.  The analysis should identify who authored the source, when it was authored, and with what motives.  In addition, the student should determine what the source can fairly tell us about Russian history.  The five source essays will represent 15% of the total grade for the course; three of the five must be submitted before the midterm examination, and every essay must be submitted before the class when that source is discussed.
  2. Papers:  Two.  Students will prepare two short papers (approximately 5-6 pp.).  Detailed assignment will be distributed in class, but the first paper will consider Ivan the Terrible, and the second will ask students to research the role that one non-Russian ethnicity played in the Russian Empire.  Each paper will count for 25% of the final course grade.
  3. Examinations:  Two. A mid-term (20% of course grade) will be given in class, Thursday, October 14, and a final examination as announced (25% of course grade).

 

As simple addition will prove, these requirements make it possible to collect 110% of the total course grade, which should provide a slight boost to everyone's grade.

 

COURSE SCHEDULE AND ASSIGNMENTS

 

8/26     MODERN RUSSIA AND ITS ORIGINS: WHAT ARE THE ISSUES?

            Poe, Russian Moment (all)

            Kappeler, Russian Empire, 1-8, 283-323

            Moss, A History of Russia, 1-11 (*1997)/ 1-11 (2003)

 

8/31     THE MULTI-ETHNIC PEOPLING OF RUS'

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 3-20

            Kappeler, Russian Empire, 14-20

 

9/2       THE STRUCTURE OF THE STATE IN KIEVAN RUS'

Reinterpreting Russian History, 21-37.  Access an English translation of the Expanded Pravda on-line at http://web.grinnell.edu/individuals/kaiser/EXRP.HTML, and compare with the Short Pravda to see how state administration changed within a century or so.

            Moss, A History of Russia, 13-26/13-32

 

9/7       ECONOMY AND SOCIETY IN KIEVAN RUS'

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 38-59

            Moss, A History of Russia, 35-42/35-41

 

9/9       CULTURE AND EVERYDAY LIFE IN KIEVAN RUS'

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 60-78

The Statute of St. Vladimir (http://web.grinnell.edu/individuals/kaiser/Vlad.html) purports to be a document by which St. Vladimir institutionalized a financial and legal relationship with the church in Rus'.  Consider what this document tells us about the social and moral world of Kievan Rus'. 

            Moss, A History of Russia, 42-54/42-52

 

9/14     STATE-BUILDING IN POST-KIEVAN RUS': 

            DISINTEGRATION OF KIEVAN RUS' AND THE RISE OF MOSCOW

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 79-99, 103-104

            Moss, A History of Russia, 56-67/52-64

 

9/16     ECONOMY AND SOCIETY IN POST-KIEVAN RUS'; EVALUATING THE TATAR YOKE

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 99-102, 104-26

            Moss, A History of Russia, 69-81/65-77

 

9/21     CULTURE AND EVERYDAY LIFE IN APPANAGE RUS'

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 127-45

            Moss, A History of Russia, 106-129/101-123

 

9/23     RISE OF MOSCOW AND THE CENTRALIZED RUSSIAN STATE

            Sudebnik (Law Code) of 1497:

                      http://www.departments.bucknell.edu/russian/const/sudebnik.html

            Moss, A History of Russia, 83-104/79-99

 

9/26, 7:30 PM, ARH 124:  Public screening of Ivan the Terrible, pt. 1, dir. Sergei Eisenstein, 1942 (RUS-VHS-VT-066) (94 mins.)

 

 

9/28     APPRAISING THE AUTOCRATIC TSAR: IVAN IV

            Pavlov and Perrie, Ivan the Terrible 1-106

            Handouts

            Reinterpreting Russian History 151-54

            *Dmytryshyn, Medieval Russia [1967], 177-92

OR

            *Dmytryshyn, Medieval Russia [1974], 209-24

            RECOMMENDED: *Neuberger, Ivan 1-48

           

 

 

 

9/28, 7:30 PM, ARH 124:  Public screening of  Ivan the Terrible, pt. 2, dir. Sergei Eisenstein, 1946 (RUS-VHS-VT-067) (90 mins)

 

 

9/30     APPRAISING THE AUTOCRATIC TSAR:  IVAN IV

            Pavlov and Perrie, Ivan the Terrible, 107-207

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 154-63

            *Dmytryshyn, Medieval Russia [1967], 199-207

OR

            *Dmytryshyn, Medieval Russia [1974], 231-39

AND

            Moss, A History of Russia, 133-49/127-43

 

10/5     CRISIS, CIVIL WAR, AND EQUILIBRIUM REGAINED

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 164-76, 180-83

            Moss, A History of Russia, 151-81/146-78

 

10/7     MUSCOVITE SOCIETY:  FAMILY, GENDER, KIN AND CLASS

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 176-80, 183-92, 213-22

            Moss, A History of Russia, 187-204/184-202

 

10/12   RUSSIA IN WESTERN EYES:  CIVIL TYRANNY? EASTERN DESPOTISM?

            Russia Engages, 2-23

            Kappeler, Russian Empire, 21-59

 

10/14   MID-TERM EXAMINATION

 

***********************A U T U M N     R E C E S S *****************************

 

10/26   STATE-BUILDING IN IMPERIAL RUSSIA: THE PETRINE SERVICE STATE

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 223-55

            Moss, A History of Russia, 223-88/223-88

 

10/28   EMPIRE-BUILDING IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

            Russia Engages, 24-71

            Kappeler, Russian Empire, 60-113

 

11/2     GENDER AND FAMILY IN IMPERIAL RUSSIA

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 351-69, 376-79

            Moss, A History of Russia, pp. 303-306, 387-91/305-308, 391-95

 

11/4     IMPERIAL RUSSIAN NOBLE SOCIETY

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 370-85

Moss, A History of Russia, 296-298, 379-82/297-99, 391-95

 

11/9     WAR AND PEACEŚWESTERNIZATION & REBELLION

            Russia Engages, 118-37

            Moss, A History of Russia, 328-40, 345-51, 353-58, 361-64/

                 331-44, 348-53, 356-61, 364-68

 

11/11   THE ECONOMY OF THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 268-89

            Moss, A History of Russia, 290-96/291-99

 

11/16   PEASANT LIFE IN THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 290-311

            Moon, Abolition, 9-55

            Moss, A History of Russia, 298-300, 383-87/299-301, 386-91

 

11/18   URBAN LIFE IN THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 312-33

            Moss, A History of Russia, 372-78/376-82

 

11/23   THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE:  A MULTI-ETHNIC SOCIETY

            Russia Engages, 90-116

            Kappeler, Russian Empire, 114-67

            Moss, A History of Russia, 182-85, 279-87 (review), 336-45, 358-61, 364-67/

                 178-80, 280-85 (review), 338-47, 368-70

           

**********************T H A N K S G I V I N G   R E C E S S**********************

 

11/30   RUSSIA CONQUERS THE CAUCASUS AND CENTRAL ASIA

Kappeler, Russian Empire, 168-212

Russia Engages, 138-61

            Moss, A History of Russia, 458-64/464-71

 

12/2     RELIGIONS AND SOCIETY IN THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 334-50

Moss, A History of Russia, 311-26/313-28

 

12/7     REFORMING STATE AND SOCIETY

            Reinterpreting Russian History, 257-67, 428-45

            Moon, Abolition, 56-109

            Moss, A History of Russia, 367-70, 417-26/371-74, 422-31

 

12/9     EMPIRE UNRAVELLING:  MODERNITY, NATIONALISM, REVOLUTION

            Kappeler, Russian Empire, 213-82

            Moon, Abolition, 110-129